Now Playing
HOT 105!
Last Song Played
Today's R&B and Old School
On Air
No Program
Now Playing
HOT 105!
Last Song Played
Today's R&B and Old School

national govt & politics

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >

Steve Bannon out as White House strategist

Almost exactly one year after Steve Bannon left his position as executive chair of the conservative website Breitbart News in favor of joining Donald Trump's 2016 presidential campaign, the 63-year-old is leaving the White House.

>> Read more trending news

The White House confirmed in a statement that Friday would be Bannon’s last day as part of the administration.

Tennessee congressman to file articles of impeachment

A Tennessee congressman announced Thursday that he plans to introduce articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump, CBS News reported.

>> Read more trending news

"In response to the horrific events in Charlottesville, I believe the President should be impeached and removed from office," Democratic Rep. Steve Cohen said in a statement released by his office. "Instead of unequivocally condemning hateful actions by neo-Nazis, white nationalists and Klansmen following a national tragedy, the President said 'there were very fine people on both sides.' There are no good Nazis. There are no good Klansmen."

>> Texas congressman: ‘Our democracy is at risk’

Cohen cited potential obstruction of justice and violations of the Constitution's Foreign Emoluments Clause as the reasons for impeachment while also addressing his own strong moral opposition to the president's words and actions relating to the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia over the weekend.

The congressman's call to remove Trump from office comes after the president blamed the Charlottesville disruption on “both sides” -- both the white supremacists leading the "Unite the Right" rally, and their counter-protesters, who Trump labeled the "alt-left."

"Well, I do think there's blame," Trump said in a news conference from Trump Tower in New York on Tuesday. "Yes, I think there is blame on both sides. You look at both sides. I think there is blame on both sides. And I have no doubt about it. And you don't have doubt about it either.”

>> California representative files impeachment article

Cohen also serves as a Ranking Member of the House Judiciary Subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice. 

"As a Jew and as an American and as a representative of an African American district, I am revolted by the fact that the President of the United States couldn't stand up and unequivocally condemn Nazis who want to kill Jews and whose predecessors murdered 6 million Jews during the Holocaust, and could not unequivocally condemn Klansmen whose organization is dedicated to terrorizing African Americans," according to Cohen's statement.

Secret Service investigating Missouri lawmaker’s post

The Secret Service is investigating comments made on social media by a Missouri state senator who reportedly said she hoped President Donald Trump would be assassinated, CNN reported.

>> Read more trending news

Democratic State Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal's comment on personal Facebook page -- “I hope Trump is assassinated -- was deleted, but it has triggered a call for her resignation by fellow legislators.

"The St. Louis Field Office of the Secret Service is looking into the comments," Secret Service spokeswoman Cathy Milhoan said in a statement to CNN. "The Secret Service investigates all threats against the President, Vice President, and other protectees, whether they be direct, implied or comments in passing.

Chappelle-Nadal has apologized for the post, telling KMOV that the comment arose from her frustration from the current political climate in the United States, particularly in the wake of the unrest last weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia. On Saturday, a car drove through a crowd of counter-protesters, killing one woman and injuring several other people. Trump’s initial response was criticized after he said there was blame “on many sides” for the violence.

Chappelle-Nadal backed off her initial Facebook post Thursday.

“No, I don't want to see anyone assassinated, but he should not be president, he should be impeached,” she told KMOV. “Someone wrote a statement on my Facebook and I responded with something that shouldn't have been put up there."

Missouri lawmakers condemned the remark.

Missouri Sen. Claire McCaskill, a fellow Democrat, said in a statement: "I condemn it. It's outrageous. And she should resign."

Stephen Webber, chairman of the Missouri Democratic Party, called Chappelle-Nadal’s comments “indefensible.”

“All sides need to agree that there is no room for suggestions of political violence in America -- and the Missouri Democratic Party will absolutely not tolerate calls for the assassination of the President,” Webber said. “I believe she should resign."

Missouri Republican Gov. Eric Greitens also demanded she resign in a statement, the St. Louis Post-Dispatch reported.

"We can have differences in our country, but no one should encourage political violence. The senator should resign,” Greitens said.

U.S. Rep. William Lacy Clay told the Post-Dispatch that “calling for the assassination of the President is a federal crime. … (She is) an embarrassment to our state. She should resign immediately.”

Chappelle-Nadal said she would not step down.

“No. Absolutely not. I told people if there are legislators cheating on their wives and smoking marijuana in their offices and they’re not being asked to resign, I am not going to resign for a mistake I made and owned up to,” she told Fox2Now of St, Louis.

She repeated 

“I am not resigning,” she tweeted. “When POC are respected by this WH & they are willing to do real work, I'll sit down with them. People are traumatized!”

Trump calls efforts to remove Confederate monuments 'so foolish'

President Donald Trump on Thursday again criticized recent decisions to remove Confederate monuments across the country, calling the moves “so foolish” and the monuments irreplaceable.

>> Read more trending news

“Sad to see the history and culture of our great country being ripped apart with the removal of our beautiful statues and monuments,” Trump wrote in the first of a series of tweets. “You can’t change history, but you can learn from it.”

He echoed comments he made at a fiery news conference in New York earlier this week, in which he wondered whether monuments remembering former presidents George Washington or Thomas Jefferson would be next to fall.

>> Related: Trump again blames ‘both sides’ for violence in Charlottesville 

“The beauty that is being taken out of our cities, towns and parks will be greatly missed and never able to be comparably replaced!” the president wrote.

His comments came amid continued criticism from across the political spectrum over his insistence that “both sides” were to blame for deadly, racially-charged violence that took place over the weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia.

>> Related: Heather Heyer's parents preach love, action after daughter's death: 'You just magnified her'

Police said 32-year-old Heather Heyer was killed Saturday during a counterprotest of a rally organized by white supremacists. The rally was aimed at protesting the removal of a Confederate statue from the city’s Emancipation Park.

Authorities arrested James Alex Fields Jr., 20, on charges including second-degree murder and malicious wounding in connection with Heyer’s death. Police said he slammed a car into two stopped vehicles and rammed counterprotesters. Fields, from Ohio, participated in the rally and was described by a former high school teacher as a fan of Adolf Hitler.

Trump slams Lindsey Graham, media over Charlottesville backlash

Update:  Sen. Lindsey Graham has responded to President Donald Trump’s tweets Thursday morning.

Graham, also using Twitter as a forum, has challenged the president, saying, “Mr. President, like most I seek to move our nation, my state and our party forward - toward the light - not back to the darkness.”

Original story: President Donald Trump took to Twitter early Thursday to respond to the backlash over his comments on the deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, slamming Sen. Lindsey Graham and the media.

>> Trump again blames ‘both sides’ for violence in Charlottesville

"Publicity seeking Lindsey Graham falsely stated that I said there is moral equivalency between the KKK, neo-Nazis & white supremacists ... and people like Ms. Heyer," he wrote, referring to Heather Heyer, the 32-year-old woman killed Saturday while protesting the white supremacist Unite the Right rally. "Such a disgusting lie. He just can't forget his election trouncing. The people of South Carolina will remember!"

Trump added: "The public is learning (even more so) how dishonest the Fake News is. They totally misrepresent what I say about hate, bigotry etc. Shame!"

On Wednesday, Graham, R-S.C., issued the following statement:

"Mr. President, I encourage you to try to bring us together as a nation after this horrific event in Charlottesville. Your words are dividing Americans, not healing them," Graham said, according to CNN. "Through his statements yesterday, President Trump took a step backward by again suggesting there is moral equivalency between the white supremacist neo-Nazis and KKK members who attended the Charlottesville rally and people like Ms. Heyer."

>> Read more trending news

In a news conference Tuesday, Trump blamed "both sides" for the violence.

“You had many people in that group other than neo-Nazis and white nationalists," he said. "The press has treated them absolutely unfairly.”

He added: "You also had some very fine people on both sides."

Republican 'Fox & Friends' guest breaks down over Trump's Charlottesville response

President Donald Trump is known to be an avid viewer of “Fox & Friends,” but on Wednesday morning, the show wasn’t entirely kind to him. Republican strategist Gianno Caldwell, who heads up Caldwell Strategic Consulting in Washington, D.C., broke down when talking about Trump’s response to the deadly Charlottesville violence.

>> Watch the clip here

Host Abby Huntsman first asked Johns Hopkins professor Wendy Osefo for her stance; Huntsman introduced the topic as the removal of Confederate monuments. However, Osefo quickly addressed the racism she saw in Charlottesville, saying, “This is not ‘talking points’ here; this is personal. And we as a nation, as a country, have to do better.”

>> Trump again blames ‘both sides’ for violence in Charlottesville

Huntsman moved to Caldwell, saying, “There are good people on both sides of this debate. We talk about keeping these statues up, people that I’ve talked to have said this is about history. How do we move forward — how do we learn from those mistakes if we just tear everything down?” But Caldwell, clearly emotional, opened by saying, “Last night I couldn’t sleep at all. Because President Trump — our president — has literally betrayed the conscience of our country.”

>> Woman who allegedly helped topple North Carolina Confederate statue arrested

Caldwell then hit back directly at Huntsman’s remarks, saying, “It’s very unfortunate that our president would say things like he did in that press conference yesterday when he says, ‘There’s good people on the side of the Nazis. They weren’t all Nazis. They weren’t all white supremacists.”He continued:

"Mr. President, good people don’t pal around with Nazis and white supremacists. Maybe they don’t consider themselves white supremacists and Nazis, but certainly they hold those views. This has become very troubling, and for anyone to come on any network and defend what President Trump did and said at that press conference yesterday is completely lost, and the potential to be morally bankrupt. I am sorry, no I believe that, and I’m being very honest as someone who has been talking about these issues for a very long time. I’m sorry that this is where we are right now."

>> Read more trending news

Huntsman tried to return to her talking point of the Confederate statues, saying, “It’s a slippery slope. Where does that end? Where do you fall specifically on that debate?” Caldwell said, “People who are taking down the statues should do so legally. … You can’t destroy property. That’s against the law.”

“Fox & Friends” is generally friendly to Trump, and his Twitter feed often directly references the show — if he sees something he likes on “Fox & Friends,” he quickly tweets it out to his 36 million followers. The New York Times noted that “for no other reason than its No. 1 fan, ['Fox & Friends'] is the most powerful TV show in America.”

Woman who allegedly helped topple North Carolina Confederate statue arrested

The woman who allegedly climbed a ladder to the top of a Confederate statue in Durham, North Carolina, and put a rope around its neck so the gathered crowd could pull it down has been arrested.

>> Watch the clip here

Takiyah Thompson, 22, who reportedly admitted she was the one who climbed the ladder — and she said she’d do it again — was taken into custody shortly after protesters held a news conference Tuesday afternoon at North Carolina Central University, according to WTVD in Raleigh-Durham.

She was charged with disorderly conduct by injury to a statue, damage to real property, participation in a riot with property damage in excess of $1,500, and inciting others to riot where there is property damage in excess of $1,500.

>> WATCH: Protesters topple Confederate statue in North Carolina

Those who took part in the toppling of the Confederate statue held the news conference Tuesday to call for any charges related to the incident to be dropped. However, according to WTVD, more arrests could be coming. The video showing the toppling of the statue went viral.

Thompson was given a $10,000 unsecured bond. The World Worker’s Party Durham chapter, of which Thompson is a member, has set up a legal defense fund to help fight her case in court.

>> There are hundreds of Confederate monuments, not just in the South

“The people decided to take matters into our own hands and remove the statue,” said Thompson, a student at N.C. Central University. “We are tired of waiting on politicians who could have voted to remove the white supremacist statues years ago, but they failed to act. So we acted.”

More statues could be attempted to be torn down by protestors, according to World Worker’s Party activist Lamont Lilly, who said, “I hope so,” when asked by ABC 11 if more statues would be toppled. She said the group believes the statues are monuments to racism.

>> Read more trending news

The monument that was ripped down was of a Confederate soldier holding a rifle. It was erected in 1924, and inscribed on it are the words “In memory of the boys who wore the gray.”

“I feel like it’s important to tear down these vestiges of white supremacy,” Thompson told WTVD.

Read more here.

Trump disbands 2 key business councils after Charlottesville backlash

President Donald Trump on Wednesday announced that he is disbanding a pair of White House councils after a receiving a rash of resignations in response to his failure to immediately and forcefully denounce white supremacists in the wake of violent protests in Charlottesville, Virginia.

>> Read more trending news

“Rather than putting pressure on the businesspeople of the manufacturing council (and) strategy (and) policy forum, I am ending both,” Trump wrote Wednesday in a tweet. “Thank you all!”

George H.W., George W. Bush condemn ‘racial bigotry’ in Charlottesville statement

Two former presidents have joined the growing chorus of political voices directly condemning racial bigotry in the wake of a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville.

>> Read more trending news 

Former Presidents George H.W. and George W. Bush released a statement on Wednesday morning, addressing the past weekend’s violence. Their joint statement comes less than a day after a news conference by President Donald Trump exacerbated mounting outrage over his response to the incident, which critics said bolstered white supremacist groups.

"America must always reject racial bigotry, anti-Semitism, and hatred in all forms,” the presidents said in the statement. “As we pray for Charlottesville, we are reminded of the fundamental truths recorded by that city’s most prominent citizen in the Declaration of Independence: we are all created equal and endowed by our Creator with unalienable rights. We know these truths to be everlasting because we have seen the decency and greatness of our country.”

The statement was tweeted by Jim McGrath, spokesman for the elder Bush and his wife, Barbara.

On Tuesday, Trump doubled down on blaming “both sides” for the violence on Saturday, effectively equating the anti-racism protesters who showed up in Charlottesville with the neo-Nazis, Ku Klux Klan members and white nationalists who had gathered to rally in the city. 

MORE: Theories abound over meaning of Trump’s ‘many sides’ remark 

Saturday’s violence left an anti-racism protester, Heather Heyer, dead after James Alex Fields Jr., an Ohio man, ran his car into a crowd of protesters. Fields has been charged with second-degree murder.

University of Florida denies request for white nationalist Richard Spencer to speak

The University of Florida on Wednesday announced that it has denied a request for AltRight.com co-editor and outspoken white nationalist Richard Spencer to speak on campus next month.

>> Read more trending news

Kent Fuchs, president of the university, said last week that the National Policy Institute, which is led by Spencer, contacted officials to reserve space for an event on campus. The event was expected to feature Spencer as a guest speaker. 

But following violent, racially-charged unrest over the weekend in Charlottesville, Virginia, Fuchs said the university denied the National Policy Institute’s request, citing public safety concerns.

>> Related: ‘Alt-right’ activist Richard Spencer plans visit to University of Florida 

“This decision was made after assessing potential risks with campus, community, state and federal law enforcement officials following violent clashes in Charlottesville, Virginia, and continued calls online and in social media for similar violence in Gainesville, such as those decreeing: ‘The Next Battlefield is in Florida,’” Fuchs said.

School regulations allow non-university groups, organizations and people to rent space on campus, although the groups are expected to cover rental expenses and security costs.

Fuchs said no student or university-affiliated groups were sponsoring the event.

“I find the racist rhetoric of Richard Spencer and white nationalism repugnant and counter to everything the university and this nation stands for,” Fuchs said. He added that the university is dedicated to free speech, but added that “the First Amendment does not require a public institution to risk imminent violence to students and others.”

>> Related: White nationalist rally at A&M canceled, Texas lawmaker says

“The likelihood of violence and potential injury – not the words or ideas – has caused us to take this action,” Fuchs said.

Protests in Charlottesville took a violent turn over the weekend when crowds gathered for a rally organized by white supremacists and aimed at protesting the removal of a Confederate memorial from the city’s Emancipation Park clashed with counterprotesters demonstrating against white supremacism.

>> Related: Trump again blames ‘both sides’ for violence in Charlottesville

The protests left several injured and a 32-year-old woman dead.

Police said a car driven by James Alex Fields Jr., 20, slammed into two other vehicles and counterprotesters on Saturday, killing Heather Heyer and injuring 19 others. Fields, of Ohio, faces charges including second-degree murder and malicious wounding.

200 items
Results 1 - 10 of 200 next >